Resources for Families Dealing with Grief, Loss, and Trauma

ComPsych Guidance Resources Worldwide

A Practical Guide to Coping with Grief

Understanding the Grief Process

Grief is a natural response to loss that requires time to resolve. Coping with grief depends on many factors, from personal beliefs to one’s current stressors. Feelings associated with grief can be overwhelming, and getting through each day may be difficult. There are no clear guidelines for the grief process. Each person will resolve their grief in their own time and in their own way. However, there are five common stages related to coping with grief. When reflecting on these stages, it’s important to note that not everyone will go through all the stages. Some people may skip over a stage whereas others may find themselves going back and forth between different stages.

 

 

Stages of Grief

Denial and isolation. This is the initial reaction when confronted with loss. At first, the event seems unbelievable. Shock and numbness are two common emotions associated with this stage. Common thoughts: “This can’t be happening!”

Anger. Once the shock of the loss has subsided, it is common to feel anger—anger that the loss took place, anger at oneself or others for letting it happen, and anger at the “unfair” world. Anger may be displaced onto others or towards oneself. This is usually the most difficult stage to manage. Human nature wants to blame someone or something for the loss. Common thoughts: “Why is this happening to me?”

Bargaining. This is an attempt to postpone grieving for the loss. Bargaining may involve a conversation with a higher power. Common thoughts: “If you make this go away, I promise I will be more patient/kind/compassionate.”

Depression. Anger may be replaced by feelings of profound sadness which, in turn, can lead to feelings of depression and a sense of helplessness. This is a typical reaction to grief. Common thoughts: “It’s no use. This pain will never go away.”

Acceptance. The grieving person is now ready to accept the reality of what has taken place. The grieving process cannot be resolved until there is acceptance of the loss. Once that happens, one is able to move forward because the loss has been put in its proper context. Common thoughts: “I acknowledge that this loss has been painful, but I can get through this.”

Sometimes the circumstances surrounding the loss can make the grieving process complicated. For example, a sudden or unnatural death makes the grieving process more difficult. It can also be difficult to accept when a young person/child dies. Often there are feelings of guilt and helplessness following the death of a loved one. It is common to feel guilt and think: “Why couldn’t I have done something to prevent this from happening?” This is referred to as “survivor’s guilt” and is regarded as a normal reaction to loss.

It is important to allow oneself the time to process the event and to talk through the different feelings one may be experiencing. Death is a sad occasion, and while it is important to grieve the loss of a loved one, do not forget to honor his or her life.

 

 

Strategies for Coping

  • Share your feelings. Express your feelings as they arise. Take time to cry, if needed. Share your feelings with others as they may feel the same way as you. Mutual support can help you get through the grieving process. Some people even find a cathartic release from writing a letter to the deceased, expressing their feelings.
  • Find someone you trust. Talk with a family member or close friend about your grief.
  • Take care of yourself. Accept offers of help and companionship from those around you. Get enough rest and eat regularly. If you are irritable from lack of sleep or if you are not eating regularly, you will have less energy to cope.
  • Make daily decisions. This will give you a feeling of control over your life. Know your limits and don’t make major changes. If a problem is beyond your control and cannot be changed, accept it.
  • Maintain your daily routine. This will give you a feeling of control over your life and bring a sense of normalcy.
  • Practice relaxation and meditation. Create a quiet scene. You can’t always get away from a situation, but you can visualize a quiet scene or a walk along the beach. Such visualization will temporarily remove you from your present situation and allow you to relax.
  • Take one thing at a time. At this time, any ordinary workload may seem overwhelming. Perform one task at a time until the project is completed.
  • Allow extra time. If you usually plan half an hour to complete a specific task, schedule forty-five minutes to complete it. Do the best you can. Don’t be too critical of yourself.
  • Take a break. Reading a favorite book or watching a favorite TV program will give you the break that you may need to relax. 
  • Be patient. Mourning takes time. It is common to have a roller-coaster of emotions for a while. Don’t force yourself through the grief process. Be patient while you are experiencing different emotions over short period of time.

 

 

Common Reactions to Grief

I. Physical Reactions

  • Fatigue
  • Sadness
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches
  • Crying spells
  • Loss of appetite

 

II. Cognitive Reactions

  • Confusion
  • Hyper-vigilance
  • Intrusive memory
  • Recurrent thoughts
  • Lack of concentration

 

III. Emotional Reactions

  • Anger
  • Denial
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Apprehension
  • Grief and sadness

     

      IV. Behavioral Reactions

      • Emotional outbursts
      • Avoidance of others
      • Impaired work performance
      • Increase in alcohol consumption
      • Increased interpersonal conflicts
      • Decreased interests in usual activities
      • Trouble sleeping or excessive sleeping

       

       

      Common Myths Regarding Grief

      Myth: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it.

      Fact: Trying to ignore your pain will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing to occur, it is necessary to actively deal with it.

       

      Myth: It’s important to “be strong” in the face of your loss.

      Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to protect your family/friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you to deal with the loss.

       

      Myth: Grieving should last no longer than a year.

      Fact: There is no specific time frame for grieving. How long it takes differs from person to person. Take the time you need.

       

      Myth: If you don’t cry, it means you are not grieving.

      Fact: Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it.

       

      Myth: Going to counseling or a support group is always helpful.

      Fact: Research shows that there is no significant difference between individuals who participated in counseling versus those who did not. Everyone copes in their own way. It’s important to find what works for you.

       

      Myth: Moving on with your life means you are forgetting about the person who died.

      Fact: Moving on means you’ve accepted the reality of the individual’s death which is not the same as forgetting.

       

      Myth: The goal is to get over the grief.

      Fact: We live in a society that is both afraid of death and afraid of emotions. We are not encouraged to express our emotions and many people view grief as something to get over rather than experience. Grief is a process which should not be rushed. Give yourself time to grieve.

       

       

      Dos and Don’ts During the Grief Process

      People who experience grief may often demonstrate changes in behavior. These suggestions will help reduce the probability of long-term reactions.  

      Don’ts

      • Don’t stay away from work.
      • Don’t withdraw from others.
      • Don’t look for easy answers.
      • Don’t increase caffeine intake.
      • Don’t reduce leisure activities.
      • Don’t make major life changes.
      • Don’t drink alcohol excessively.
      • Don’t take on new major projects.
      • Don’t have unrealistic expectations.
      • Accept the ups and downs of grieving.
      • Don’t expect yourself to get better in a day.

       

      Dos

      • Get enough rest.
      • Maintain regular diet.
      • Follow a familiar routine.
      • Take one thing at a time.
      • Talk to supportive people.
      • Maintain an exercise regimen.
      • Spend time with family/friends.
      • Expect the experience to upset you.
      • Contact an appropriate professional, if your reactions persist.
      • Expect a range of emotions- this is normal.
      • Forgive yourself for what you did or didn’t do.

       

      Additional Information

      This information is brought to you by ComPsych® GuidanceResources. This information is for educational purposes only. It is always important to consult with the appropriate professional on medical, legal, behavioral or other issues. As you read this information, it is your responsibility to make sure that the facts and ideas apply to your situation.

      National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Article

      School Safety and Crisis

      WHEN GRIEF/LOSS HITS CLOSE TO HOME: TIPS FOR CAREGIVERS ARTICLE

      The nature of the loss (i.e., expected vs. sudden) will impact the way caregivers address the loss of a family member. While grief is often characterized by sadness, emotional pain, and introspection in adults, children’s grief reactions will vary depending upon their developmental level. More specifically among preschoolers one might observe regressive behaviors, decreased verbalization, and increased anxiety. Among elementary school aged children one might observe decreased academic performance, attention/concentration, and attendance; irritability, aggression, and disruptive behaviors; somatic complaints; sleep/eating disturbances; social withdrawal; guilt, depression, and anxiety; and repeated telling of the event. And among middle and high school age youth one might observe decreased academic performance, attention/concentration, and attendance; avoidance, withdrawal, high risk behaviors or substance abuse, difficulty with peer relations, nightmares, flashbacks, and emotional numbing or depression. The death of a family member may be further complicated by the child’s relationship to the deceased as well as to the surviving parent (e.g., if mom and dad are divorced). Cultural factors are important to consider when working with family members after a loss. Some families will be more open to discussing the loss whereas others based on cultural/religious beliefs may choose and request that the loss “not be addressed at all.”

       

      STRATEGIES FOR FAMILIES DEALING WITH AN ANTICIPATORY LOSS (E.G., TERMINAL ILLNESS)

      • With anticipated loss, children may have had to endure weeks, months, or even years of watching their loved one deteriorate, in some cases both physically and mentally, which can significantly disrupt children’s academic, behavioral and social/emotional functioning. Thus, family members should be extra vigilant to such changes. Instead of being punitive, try to address the changes through consulting with a school-employed or community-based counselor or psychologist. There are generally four phases of anticipatory grief: depression, extreme concern for the dying person, preparing for the death, and adjusting to changes caused by the death. But again not every child travels through these four phases in a linear process as with grieving in general.
      • Ambiguous loss is often also a factor with anticipatory grief. As children watch the changes in their parents and loss of physical/cognitive capacities, they need to continuously adapt to both their own “new role in the family” (e.g., possibly becoming a caretaker), as well as to the changed roles in the entire family system (e.g., financial changes due to parent being unable to work; parent’s compromised ability to take care of children’s everyday needs).
      • Strategies for dealing with “ambiguous loss” while the loved one is still physically alive but psychologically changed or absent often include adaptive creative arts therapies to encourage children to talk more about their experiences. Although most of these strategies are appropriate in therapeutic settings, some may be adapted for parents and family members to use at home.

       

      • Narrative therapy or helping your children “tell their own story” about their experiences can be useful. This can be done by helping your children consider “two choices” to end a story, and have them choose the one that represents a more adaptive way to deal with his or her feelings. Alternatively, if children are unable to tell their story, you can use animals or inanimate objects to personify people as these may be less threatening.
      • Some activities appropriate for the home wetting include “bibliotherapy”; for example, reading books such as: (1) Charlotte’s Web (EB White, 1952) which deals with the “cycle of life”, (2) The Last Lecture” (Randy Pausch, 2007) is both a book and a YouTube video in which a terminally ill professor imparts his parental wisdom to his children through a “lecture” with life lessons. This can help engage children in a family discussion about anticipatory grief., and (3) Using art projects where you ask your children to “draw” their feelings about the terminally ill family member may also be useful.
      • It is recommended that when seeking mental health support for ambiguous loss, the entire family be included; when possible include siblings, parents, and/or other important people in their lives.
      • Encouraging children to make decisions, such as whether or not they wish to take part in funeral services (when age appropriate) is recommended.

       

      STRATEGIES FOR FAMILIES COPING WITH SUDDEN LOSS OF A LOVED ONE

      • Reactions among children may be extremely variable in cases of sudden unexpected death or loss. It often depends upon the nature of the “sudden loss” (e.g., if the sudden loss was violent or illness related death). There are generally four phases of grief: but not every child travels through these four phases in a linear process.
      1. Shock and Numbness (stunned, difficulty thinking clearly)
      2. Yearning and Searching (restless, angry, guilty, bewildered)
      3. Disorientation and Disorganization (extreme sadness, possible continued guilt and anger)
      4. Reorganization and Resolution (accept the loss)
      • Suicide or drug overdoses, which are sudden and unexpected losses, may often be especially difficult for family members to cope with because of the stigma associated with these types of deaths. Especially in these instances, it is important to encourage children to talk about the death openly at home. Saying “we are not going to talk about this” will likely interfere with the grieving process. Parents should look to community resources for specialized support groups that include others dealing with a similar loss.
      • “Survivor guilt” may be a reaction to sudden loss. It is important that this be recognized and acknowledged when we hear statements such as “I wish it were me instead.” Survivor guilt may also manifest itself in excessive self-blame. It is important to recognize and try to understand with these feelings, but also let the affected family member know that it was not their fault. For example, following a suicide death surviving family members should be told that ultimately the only person responsible for the death was the deceased.

      REFERENCES USED

      Bowlby, J. (1980). Loss: Sadness and depression. (Vol. 3). New York, NY: Basic Books.

      Boss, P. (2010). The trauma and complicated grief of ambiguous loss. Pastoral Psychology, 59(2), pp 137-145. doi: 10.1007/s11089-009-0264-0.

      Brown, J. A., Jimerson, S. R., & Comerchero, V. A. (2014). Cognitive development considerations to support bereaved students: Practical applications for school psychologists. Contemporary School Psychology. Advance online publication. doi:10.1007/s40688-014-0018-6

      Dogan-Ates, A. (2010). Developmental differences in children’s and adolescents’ post-disaster reactions. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31, 470-476. doi:10.3109/01612840903582528

      Mayo Clinic Staff. (2014). Complicated Grief. Retrieved from: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/complicated-grief/basics/…

      Book It! School Counselors and the Use of Children's Literature (Bibliotherapy List)

      Virginia School Counselor Association Conference - Newport News, Virginia

      April Sikes, M.Ed., LAPC - Old Dominion University

      Jasmine Harris, M.S.Ed., NCC - McIntosh Elementary School

      April 4, 2008

       

      Feelings

      The Way I Feel by Janan Cain. Publishing Company is Parenting Press. This book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Proud of Our Feelings by Lindsay Leghorn. Publishing Company is Magination Press. This book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.maginationpress.com.

       

      What Are You So Grumpy About? by Tom Lichtenheld. Publishing Company is Little, Brown Young Readers. Book is for Grades K-3 (ages 5-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      How Are You Peeling by Saxton Reyman. Publishing Company is Scholastic Inc. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      How I Feel Scared by Marcia Leonard. Publishing Company is Smart Kinds Publishing. The book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      How I Feel Silly by Marcia Leonard. Publishing Company is Smart Kinds Publishing. The book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      How I Feel Happy by Marcia Leonard. Publishing Company is Smart Kinds Publishing. The book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Bullying

      Stop Picking on Me by Pat Thomas. Publishing Company is Barron's Educational Series, Inc. This book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.barronseduc.com.

       

      How to Lose All Your Friends by Nancy Carlson. Publishing Company is Penguin Group. This book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      My Secret Bully by Trudy Ludwig. Publishing Company is Tricycle Press. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      The Recess Queen by Alexis O'Neill and Laura Hulishka-Beith. Publishing Company is Scholastic Inc. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      Bully on the Bus by Carl W. Bosch. Publishing Company is Parenting Press. The book is for Grades 2-6 (ages 7-11) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      The Bully Blockers Club by Teresa Bateman. Publishing Company is Albert Whitman & Company. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Just A Bully by Gina and Mercer Mayer. Publishing Company is Golden Books. The book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Differences and Appreciating Others

      The Crayon Box That Talked by Shane DeRolf. Publishing Company is Random House Books. This book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.randomhouse.com.

       

      Nobody Likes Me! by Raoul Krischanitz. Publishing Company is North-South Books, Inc. This book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Whoever You Are by Mem Fox. Publishing Company is Scholastic Inc. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      The Colors of Us by Karen Katz. Publishing Company is Henry Holt and Company, LLC. Book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Black Like Kyra, White Like Me by Judith Vigna. Publishing Company is Albert Whitman & Company. The book is for Grades 1-6 (ages 6-11) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Whoever You Are by Mem Fox. Publishing Company is Scholastic Inc. The book is for Grades K-2 (ages 5-7) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      Old Velvet by Mary E. Whitcomb. Publishing Company is Chronicle Books, LLC. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      The War Between the Vowels and The Consonants by Priscilla Turner. Publishing Company is Sunburst. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Friendship

      Ruby Gloom's Guide to Friendship by Matt Riser. Publishing Company is Harry N. Abrams, Inc. This book is for Grades K-6 (ages 5-12) and can be purchased at www.abramsbooks.com.

       

      Enemy Pie by Derek Munson. Publishing Company is Chronicle Books, LLC. This book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 3-8) and can be purchased at www.chroniclekids.com.

       

      The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister. Publishing Company is North-South Books. Book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Charlie the Caterpillar by Dom Deluise. Publishing Company is Aladdin. Book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Sexual and Physical Abuse

      Something Happened and I'm Scared to Tell by Patricia Kehoe. Publishing Company is Parenting Press, Inc. The book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 3-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      What's Going to Happen by Eunice H. Hannah. Publishing Company is Marco Products. The book is for Grades 1-4 (ages 6-9) and can be purchased at www.marcoproducts.com.

       

      When I Was Little Like You by Jane Porett. Publishing Company is Child Welfare League of America. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.cwla.org.

       

       

      Tattling

      A Bad Case of Tattle Tongue by Julia Cook. Publishing Company is Marco Products. Book is for Grades K-3 (ages 5-8) and can be purchased at www.marcoproducts.com.

       

      Armadillo Tattletale by Helen Ketteman. Publishing Company is Scholastic. Book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      Don't Squeal Unless It's a Big Deal: A Tale of Tattletales by Jeanie Franz Ransom. Publishing Company is Magination Press. The book is for Grades K-3 (ages 5-8) and can be purchased at www.macroproducts.com.

       

      The Tattle Tail Tale by Tandy Braid. Publishing Company is PublishAmerica. The book is for Grades K-3 (ages 5-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Divorce

      Mama and Daddy Bear's Divorce by Cornelia Maude Spelman. Publishing Company is Albert Whitman & Company. This book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Dinosaurs Divorce: A Guide for Changing Families by Marc Brown and Laurene Krasny Brown. Publishing Company is Little, Brown Young Readers. This book is for Grades 1-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Was It the Chocolate Pudding?: A Story for Little Kids About Divorce by Sandra Levins and Bryan Langdo. Publishing Company is American Psychological Association. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 2-6) and can be purchased at www.maginationpress.com.

       

      What Can I Do? A Book for Children of Divorce by Danielle Lowry. Publishing Company is American Psychological Association. Book is for Grades 3-7 (ages 8-12) and can be purchased at www.maginationpress.com.

       

      I Don't Want to Talk About It: A Story About Divorce for Young Children by Jeanie Franz Ransom. Publishing Company is American Psychological Association. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.maginationpress.com.

       

       

      Good Touch, Bad Touch

      Uncle Willy's Tickles: A Child's Right to Say No by Marcie Aboff. Publishing Company is Magination Press. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.maginationpress.com.

       

      My Body Is Private by Linda Walvoord Girad. Publishing Company is Albert Whitman & Company. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      It's MY Body by Lory Freeman. Publishing Company is Parenting Press, Inc. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      A Very Touching Book by Jan Hindman. Publishing Company is Alexandria Associates. Book is for Grades PreK-7 (ages 4-12) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Listening Skills

      Listen, Buddy by Helen Lester. Publishing Company is Houghton Mifflin Company. The book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.maginationpress.com.

       

      Howard B. Wigglebottom Learns to Listen by Howard Binkow. Publishing Company is Thunderbolt Publishing. The book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Why Should I Listen? by Claire Llewellyn. Publishing Company is Barron's Educational Series. Book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Crocodile Listens by April Pulley Sayre. Publishing Company is Greenwillow. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      First Day of School (Kindergarten)

      The Night Before Kindergarten by Natasha Wing. Publishing Company is Grosset & Dunlap. The book is for Grades PreK-K (ages 3-5) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Welcome to Kindergarten by Anne Rockwell. Publishing Company is Walter Books. The book is for Grades PreK-K (ages 3-5) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Kindergarten Rocks by Katie Davis. Publishing Company is Harcourt, Inc. Book is for Grades PreK-K (ages 4-5) and can be purchased at www.harcourtbooks.com.

       

      Look Out Kindergarten, Here I Come by Nancy Carlson. Publishing Company is Penguin Putnam Books. Book is for Grades PreK-K (ages 3-5) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Death/Loss/Grief

      I Miss You: A First Look at Death by Pat Thomas. Publishing Company is Barron's Educational Series. The book is for Grades K-2 (ages 5-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      What on Earth Do You Do When Someone Dies? by Trevor Romain. Publishing Company is Free Spirit Publishing. The book is for Grades 1-6 (ages 6-11) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Everett Anderson's Goodbye by Lucille Clifton. Publishing Company is The Trumphet Club. Book is for Grades K-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Tear Soup by Pat Schwiebert and Chuck DeKlyen. Publishing Company is Grief Watch. Book is for Grades 1-4 (ages 6-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      A Story for Hippo by Simon Puttock and Alison Bartlett. Publishing Company is Scholastic Press. Book is for Grades K-2 (ages 5-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Self-Control

      No, David by David Shannon. Publishing Company is Blue Sky Press. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      David Gets in Trouble by David Shannon. Publishing Company is Blue Sky Press. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      David Goes to School by David Shannon. Publishing Company is Blue Sky Press. The book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      Today Was a Terrible Day by Patricia Reilly Giff. Publishing Company is Puffin. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      School Isn't Fair by Patricia Baehr. Publishing Company is Aladdin Paperbacks. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 3-5) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Hands Are Not For Hitting by Martine Agassi. Publishing Company is Free Spirit Publishing. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 3-5) and can be purchased at www.freespirit.com.

       

      They Didn't Use Their Heads by Jo Ann Stover. Publishing Company is BJU Press. Book is for Grades K-1 (ages 5-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      It's Hard to Be Five: Learning How to Work My Control Panel by Jamie Lee Curtis and Laura Cornell. Publishing Company is HarperCollins Children's Books. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.jamieleecurtisbooks.com.

       

       

      Anger Management

      The Very Angry Day That Amy Didn't Have by Lawrence E. Shapiro. Publishing Company is Childswork/Childsplay. The book is for Grades 1-3 (ages 6-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Monster Boy by Christine Winn and David Walsh. Publishing Company is Fairview Press. The book is for Grades 1-4 (ages 6-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry by Molly Bang. Publishing Company is Scholastic Inc. The book is for Grades PreK-2 (ages 4-7) and can be purchased at www.scholastic.com.

       

      Andrew's Angry Words by Dorothea Lachner. Publishing Company is North-South Books Inc. Book is for Grades K-2 (ages 5-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Don't Rant and Rave on Wednesdays!: The Children's Anger-Control Book by Adolph Moser. Publishing Company is Landmark Editions, Inc. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Everytime I Blow My Top I Lose My Head! A Kid's Guide to Keeping Cool Under Stress by Laura Slap-Shelton and Lawrence E. Shapiro. Publishing Company is Landmark Editions, Inc. Book is for Grades 2-6 (ages 7-11) and can be purchased at www.barnesandnoble.com.

       

      How to Take the Grrrr Out of Anger by Elizabeth Verdick and Majorie Lisovskis. Publishing Company is Free Spirit Publishing. Book is for Grades 2-6 (ages 7-11) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Special Needs

      Taking Seizure Disorders to School: A Story About Epilepsy by Kim Gosselin. Publishing Company is JayJo Books, LLC. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Taking Diabetes to School by Kim Gosselin. Publishing Company is JayJo Books, LLC. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Taking Asthma to School by Kim Gosselin. Publishing Company is JayJo Books, LLC. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Taking Food Allergies to School by Ellen Weiner. Publishing Company is JayJo Books, LLC. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Taking Cerebral Palsy To School by Mary Elizabeth Anderson. Publishing Company is JayJo Books, LLC. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Self-Esteem

      Don't Feed the Monster on Tuesdays!: The Children's Self-Esteem Book by Adolph Moser. Publishing Company is Landmark Editions. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      A Duck So Small by Elisabeth Holstein and A.H. Benjamin. Publishing Company is Little Tiger. The book is for Grades K-2 (ages 5-7) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell. Publishing Company is Putnam Juvenile. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Something Beautiful by Sharon Dennis Wyeth. Publishing Company is DragonFly Books. Book is for Grades PreK-6 (ages 4-11) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      The Mixed Up Chameleon by Eric Carle. Publishing Company is HarperTrophy. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.barnesandnoble.com.

       

      I'm Gonna Like Me: Letting Off a Little Self-Esteem by Jamie Lee Curtis and Laura Cornell. Publishing Company is HarperCollins Children's Books. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.jamieleecurtisbooks.com.

       

      Just the Way You Are by Marcus Pfister. Publishing Company is North-South. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Family Violence

      A Family That Fights by Sharon Chesler Bernstein. Publishing Company is Albert Whitman & Company. The book is for Grades 1-4 (ages 6-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      A Place for Starr: A Story of Hope for Children Experiencing Family Violence by Howard Schor. Publishing Company is Kidsrights. The book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      A Safe Place to Live: A Story for Children Who Have Experienced Domestic Violence by Michelle A. Harrison. Publishing Company is Kidsrights. Book is for Grades K-4 (ages 5-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      A Terrible Thing Happened by Margaret M. Holmes. Publishing Company is Magination Press. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Strangers

      Not Everyone Is Nice: Helping Children Learn Caution With Strangers by Frederick Alimonti and Ann Tedesco. Publishing Company is Small Horizons. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Who Is a Stranger and What Should I Do? by Linda Walvoord Girard. Publishing Company is Albert Whitman & Company. Book is for Grades 1-4 (ages 6-9) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

       

      Cooperation

      Swimmy by Leo Lionni. Publishing Company is Dragonfly Books. Book is for Grades PreK-3 (ages 4-8) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      Elephant on My Roof by Erin Harris. Publishing Company is Red Cygnet Press. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.

       

      The Three Bill-Goats Gruff by Ellen Appleby. Publishing Company is Scholastic Paperbacks. Book is for Grades PreK-1 (ages 4-6) and can be purchased at www.amazon.com.